Old Blokes Telling Jokes

November 26, 2014

When I first discovered the project “Old Jews Telling Jokes” I thought it was brilliant. Better yet, it was hilarious and wildly successful, going viral in books, in DVDs, on the internet (www.oldjewstellingjokes.com), and even on Broadway. A few creative folks had hatched a simple idea: video Jews telling funny stories and choose storytellers, men and women, who were at least 60 years old. The joke topics included Jewish mothers, rabbis, food, husbands and wives, illness and doctors, death, and much more. A simple form of a classic goes:
“Knock, knock.”
“Who’s there?”
“Oedipus.”
“Oedipus who?”
“Oedipus schmedipus, as long as he loves his mother.”
The project laid up a treasure of Jewish folk “telling the same old jokes they’ve been telling for forty years.”

Groucho Marx glassesSoon, despite how much I admire good Jewish humor, I began to think they shouldn’t have all the fun. On behalf of my faith community, I thought, “How about ‘Old Quakes Telling Jokes’?” It could happen. Technologically Quakers could do it. Most of us have electricity now and even video cameras; some are so skilled that people actually pay them to make videos. And I know there are old Quakes who can tell great jokes. Sadly, some of the best storytellers are now beyond old, and other terrific ones are still in training to be 60. (Sources tell me that one of our well-known training-wheel storytellers sneaked in to see “Old Jews Telling Jokes” the other night, probably to get some ideas.) But this could happen. Between the funny folks on my list and those that Friends across the country know, we have storytellers galore. Maybe even now someone is ready to set up a little studio and get started.

I suppose we would hear a variety of well-worn Quaker stories that would end with one of two punch lines: (Quaker with hunting rifle, not an Uzi, in hand, speaking to an intruder) “Friend, thee knows I would not harm thee, but thee is standing where I am about to shoot.” Or, to a balky beast, “Thee knows I cannot strike thee, but what thee does not know is that I can sell thee to a Baptist who can beat the tar out of thee.” (The word “tar” here reflects my generally polite upbringing.) Beyond these old stories, though, I’ve heard Friends joke about sensible shoes and about conferences where Quaker dietary preferences wiped out the yogurt supply for counties 50 miles around. Of course, there will be jokes about integrity, simplicity, tortuously long meetings for business, and dearly wanting to beat up warmongers. Occasionally collections of funny Quaker stories appear, such as the recently published one gathered by Chuck Fager, Quakers Are Hilarious!

Of course, I don’t want to hog this idea. It’s just that “Old Quakes…” keeps the punchy title and I know Quakers can be funny on purpose. But others should have a shot at it, too. Maybe you can get the same punch with “Old Sikhs Telling Jokes,” “Old Popes Telling Jokes,” or “Old Lutes…,” though I’m not sure that Lutes is honorable apart from Lutheran college football teams. Or you could break up the energy of the title to include others: “Old Baptists Telling Jokes,” “Old Russian Orthodox…,” “Old Sanctified Brethren…,” “Old Rastafarians…,” or “Old Fire-Breathing Disciples Telling Jokes.”

I don’t know in many instances whether such traditions even have jokes, though I think that any religion worth its salt has to have some humor in order to keep perspective and to tell the truth. Pope Francis raises my hopes by writing an apostolic exhortation (actually, a book) The Joy of the Gospel and by, on at least one occasion, wearing a clown nose as an accessory to his white papal garb. Baptist pastor Susan Sparks has a killer sense of humor and even does stand-up comedy (see Laugh Your Way to Grace). Garrison Keillor of the Sanctified Brethren helps, too. It’s reassuring to know that Quakers, with their high hilarity, won’t have to serve as jesters for the entire Christian community. Jews, clearly, have all the humor they need.

So stay alert. “Old Quakes Telling Jokes” may sprout from this seed. If you’re an old Quaker and funny, volunteer. If you’re not old enough, please stay healthy and send nominations. I think I need to start taking names.

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Comments

Comments

  1. Rosalie Grafe says:

    Possibly Facebook friend Katie Troyer might have some contributions from the Amish in Pinecraft, Sarasota, Florida?

    • hmacy says:

      Melanie reminds me that Mennonites have some great jokes and at one time had a joke site going, as I remember. I’d be happy to learn how to laugh in Amish.

  2. Mickey Edgerton says:

    Don’t forget Tom Mullen, several wonderful, very funny books, one of them “Laughing Out Loud and Other Religious Experiences”. He was a beloved teacher at Earlham School of Religion back in the 1970′s and ’80′s.

  3. Mickey Edgerton says:

    Don’t forget Tom Mullen, who wrote many very funny books. One of them was “Laughing Out Loud and Other Religious Experiences”. He was a beloved teacher at Earlham School of Religion back in the 1970′s and ’80′s.

    • hmacy says:

      Absolutely right! He’s one of my humor heroes. I was glad to have him as a friend and mentor, though for not nearly long enough.

Living in Fun

"Walking Cheerfully" is place to think out loud about how to use and enjoy humor in positive, life-giving ways. We’ll explore how following Christ in all of life can shape, not scuttle, laughter and creative play. What might it mean to laugh with others as you would have them laugh with you?

Probably the other most common posts will be "Finds in Fun." I first learned the phrase “being in fun” from Tom Mullen’s Laughing Out Loud and Other Religious Experiences. He points to the playfulness of children, who are readier to laugh and to see the silly than most adults. Living each day “in fun” often makes us laugh as we slog through a nearly endless supply of things odd, silly, klutzy, and preposterous. The stories here are mostly from my own ordinary, “in fun” days.

Fun Nooks and Crannies

There’s “Humor in the Bible,” and these posts explore where it is, how to find it, and what to do with it. It’s one way of thinking about how to read the Bible well.

Since a lot of us spend big chunks of time at work, the “Humor at Work” posts will suggest ways to stay sane and happy, to get along with cow-orkers, and to use humor to do good work.

I’m a book-pusher at heart, and some of my best friends push books, too. I even know some folks who read. So “Fun Books” posts will tell about books that are funny and help us think about humor.

Sometimes I’ll brag on some of the friends I’ve been given or share some photos I’ve enjoyed taking. Maybe you’ll laugh, maybe not, but they’ve brought joy in my journey.

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